PASEO Program Adventure—Day 38: Huanchaco, Peru

This morning (Monday), we had our class on DBT (Terapia Conductual Dialéctica), which focused on chain analysis—an integral part of this type of therapy. Chain analysis looks at the ineffective behavior an individual has conducted, in addition to the precipitating event that led to the behavior. From there, vulnerabilities surrounding the behavior and event are explored, as well as consequences stemming from the behavior, and links in between (such as actions, bodily sensations, cognitions, events, and feelings). While it’s definitely not easy being cognizant of each link when analyzing a behavior or triggering event, practicing this type of thinking and analysis regarding our actions truly helps us be more mindful of our behaviors and ways in which we can improve and react to situations differently in the future.

We also learned about validation, and the importance behind this seemingly simply concept. More often than not, we tend to respond to dilemas that others are facing by trying to fix their problems or simplify the situation. Has anyone ever told you that what you’re experiencing isn’t really all that difficult, or that you’ve overcome similar (or harder) situations before, so you’ll figure out a way to do the same once again? While the latter statement may in fact be true, it’s not exactly the response we’re always looking for. In fact, for some, this type of “validation” may lead to experiencing self-doubt in how the individual reacts to and handles trying situations.

So how do we validate what an individual is going through? Instead of trying to solve or minimize their problem, we just need to be attentive and truly listen to what they are saying. While it’s much easier to jump in and interrupt with our perceived “wisdom,” active listening will go even further and make an even greater impact. 

We were left with a quote in our class that truly resonated. It translates to something along the lines of: “Sometimes we simply need someone to be with us, not to solve our problems or anything in particular—just to make us feel that we have their support and that we are important to them.” That right there is the simplest form of validation. More often than not, all we really need is somebody to listen to us. And in that moment alone, when we have that person’s undivided attention and support, we can feel validated and supported in whatever it is that we may be experiencing.

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The Hug Award

The HUG Award

Hope Unites Globally

I have been nominated by Jen from Step On A Crack…or Break Your Mother’s Back for the HUG Award.

Jen is one of the many people who brings joy and wisdom into the blogging community through her insightful comments and great pots. I would highly recommend checking out Jen’s blog because not only is it an awesome read, but if you haven’t already met Jen, then you’re missing out! Thanks again for this amazing award!

For more information on this award, please visit:http://ahopefortoday.com/2012/01/14/hope-unites-globally-hug-award-guidelines/

I would like to give the following blogs a very big HUG for their insight, encouragement, and wisdom. Each of these bloggers make the writing process beyond enjoyable, and they all provide us with the gift of their blog, and for that, I could not be more thankful.

http://poetryandpersistence.com/

http://lostupabove.wordpress.com/

http://braininjuryselfrehabilitation.com/

http://hodgepodge4thesoul.wordpress.com/

http://50yearproject.wordpress.com/

http://ginlemonade.wordpress.com/

http://mamasgottabake.wordpress.com/

http://somethingville.com/

http://findingmyworth.wordpress.com/

Thank you for all that you do.

Best, Dan