Rejection

Although nobody likes to admit it, the majority of us have faced rejection at some point or another in our lives. In my case, I had just moved to a new school for fifth grade, and already, the end of the school year was nearing. There was about a month or so left when the kids in my grade were told that an end-of-the-year party was going to be held in honor of our upcoming graduation. Many of the boys wanted to avoid going to the party alone, so they started asking some of the girls if they would go to the dance with them. I knew who I wanted to ask, but I was too nervous to even mention the party to her. However, in realizing that this would be perfect practice for a future prom, about two weeks before the party came around I was finally able to work up enough courage to ask Madison to the dance. A few friends and I were talking in the hallways in between classes, and even though my hands were shaking and I was more nervous than I could ever remember, I pulled Madison aside as everyone else started walking to class and I asked her to the dance. After what seemed like a dramatic pause, she said yes, and it was at that moment that fireworks started shooting off into the sky and a marching band began marching along the street. Well, at least that’s how I like to remember the story. We then split up to go to class, and that was that.

A few days later, I bumped into Madison, and she told me that she could no longer go to the dance with me. Although I shrugged it off as if it was no big deal, I was pretty upset and isolated myself from everyone and everything for the rest of the day. So much for my vision of a candlelight boat dinner before the big night! I didn’t know it at the time, but this was not the end of my life. About a week or so later, our principal made an announcement saying we weren’t allowed to ask anyone to the party because it wasn’t meant to be “that kind of dance.”

I recently blogged about overcoming the word “No,” and was asked by a follower how far I extend in my philosophy of using the word “No” as motivation to continue on seeking what it is we desire or wish to accomplish. I was looking for someone to challenge and question my statement, and I’m glad someone has.

Rejection is definitely an interesting subject to discuss since there are two sides of it. You can use it as motivation or you can sulk in it. We have all been in some sort of situation where we have gotten rejected from people, jobs, etc. and in my case, plenty of females. As difficult as it is to constantly believe this thought, I’m a strong advocate that everything happens for a reason. With that being said, maybe the people we are attracted to aren’t the right fit for us. Maybe we saved ourselves from a heartbreak down the road with someone who wasn’t going to be loyal or completely interested in being with us. There are so many “what ifs” to be thought of, but I honestly do think that these things happen for a reason. I’m not going to lie, the first time I was rejected by a girl in the fifth grade, I was devastated. When I came home from school that day, I jumped into bed and just laid there thinking that my life was over. A little bit drastic for a fifth grader, I know, but I quickly had to learn that rejection is something we’re all going to face at least one time or another in our lives, so better to get it out of the way at an early age. I hope this helps anyone in doubt or facing rejection, but if there’s anything to take out of this post it’s this: Life was never meant to be easy. Everyone faces trials and tribulations, and if you look close enough at that saying, you might even be able to see the word rejection written in between the lines. We’re bound to face rejection sometime or another in our lives, because let’s face it. Without it, life would just be too simple.

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